Posts Tagged ‘book’

Preventing Autism

November 28, 2014

Researchers have learned SO much in the past 10 years about risk factors for autism and other developmental delays that I included the word “prevention” in the title, and devoted a chapter to this subject in Outsmarting Autism. I was thus thrilled when a friend introduced me to a mother who runs a parent support group for families with members on the spectrum. She thought the group a good match as a host for me on my year-long book tour.

What a surprise when I received the following response: “Thank you so much for reaching out to me. To me, autism is not something that needs to be healed or prevented. I truly believe with all my heart that it is just as much a part of my boy as him having brown hair and hazel eyes, and I want folks to accept my boy and his neurology the way it is. I respect the fact that you have dedicated your life to what you believe in. But as you can see, I may not be the best person to help you reach your readers. Respectfully yours,”

At least she was civil; the next “push back” was not. The Executive Director of an autism support group cancelled an already scheduled and promoted book signing and talk, because I use the word “prevention” in the title.  She accused me of attempting to eliminate individuals with autism. Those who have followed my 40-plus-year career of counseling families of children with disabilities know that my goal is neither annihilation nor elimination, but rather rehabilitation.

Clearly, as British homeopath Alan Freestone points out, there are two very divided camps on autism:  Those who believe we can only increase autism awareness, but not function, and those whose goal is healing.  I belong to the second contingent. Parents know that their children with autism are medically sick, not just quirky.  Any parent whose autistic child has chronic diarrhea, sleep issues or unremitting epilepsy wants more than awareness.  Haven’t the awareness folks read the desperate Facebook posts from moms who have been up every two hours bathing a child covered in feces or are sitting a vigil at a hospital where doctors are trying to stop a young boy from constant grand mal seizures?  Maybe not. Well, I believe in prevention.  My beliefs in prevention are not the same as believing in the Easter Bunny, Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.  They are based in science and I will continue to educate couples who are interested.  I do not need the naysayers in my ear. And here is what I tell them:

PRECONCEPTION

A year before conception, couples should start thinking about cleaning up their environments, changing their lifestyles, and getting rid of their body burdens. A full year out? Yes, because that’s how long it takes to replace the bad stuff, to   learn about the good stuff, and for the body to detoxify safely. The steps I recommend not only improve fertility, discourage complications of pregnancy, miscarriage, and problems during delivery, but also improve the chances of having a healthy baby. Run Laboratory Tests I love tests. For over 30 years I administered diagnostic tests to help parents understand and make informed decisions about their children’s education, health and functioning. Tests only give you information; what makes information powerful is your freedom to decide what to do with it. Here are some tests to consider BEFORE becoming pregnant.  None are routine; in most cases, you must discuss them with your doctor. If your doctor refuses to order them, you can also work with Life Extension Foundation, a membership organization.  This is a wonderful Florida-based company sells both lab tests and high quality supplements.  You have the blood work done at a local lab and one of their doctors interprets the results.  They make money by selling supplements, but their prices are good, and a bonus is a periodic magazine of research that is worth the price of membership.

  • Identify toxic elements – The earlier in gestation toxic exposures occur, the more detrimental they can be to development. Every woman should know what toxins her body is holding before she gets pregnant, and detox appropriately, to assure that her baby isn’t exposed in those early weeks before a positive pregnancy test.

Doctor’s Data Lab offers a hair analysis of over 30 potentially toxic elements, including lead, mercury, arsenic, aluminum, copper, antimony and cadmium to which we are all exposed.  According to Phillipe Granjean MD, internationally recognized environmental health expert, and author of the extraordinary book Only One Chance:  How Environmental Pollution Impairs Brain Development- and How to Protect the Brains of the Next Generation, this inexpensive test is very predictive of the toxic load a pregnant woman dumps into her unborn baby.  Shouldn’t EVERY woman have this test?

  • Screen thyroid function – Low levels of T4 or marginally elevated levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) can affect the unborn baby.  Environmental toxins are endocrine disrupters. Insufficient levels or even a mild drop of thyroid hormone in the mother at critical stages of brain development can affect cognitive function in the fetus. Have complete thyroid testing done. Once you know your levels, take natural measures, such as adding iodine to normalize thyroid function.
  • Measure vitamin D levelsEvery day we are learning about the importance of Vitamin D in health.  In 2009 researchers concluded that vitamin D deficiencies in pregnant women should be considered a risk factor for neuro-developmental disorders such as autism. Vitamin D regulates thousands of genes in the human genome. The importance of prenatal, neonatal, and postnatal vitamin D supplementation cannot be underestimated. Vitamin D during gestation and early infancy is essential for normal brain functioning.

Insufficient vitamin D is a universal problem. You want your number to be over 30, even though 25 is considered “normal.”  40 is even better!  If your level is low, start taking supplements at 2000-5000 units of D3 per day, preferably in more absorbable liposomal drops available from Biotics.  Recheck in 3 months. High doses are sometimes necessary for a short time to elevate levels. To learn more about vitamin D, check out the Vitamin D Council.

  • Run an ELISA IgG test for food sensitivities – Your doctor can order this from a local lab. Look for gluten, casein, soy, egg, garlic, and other intolerances.  Rotate mildly problematic foods and eliminate those with moderate to severe reactions. 
  • Know your genetic profile Go to 23andME and do a quick gene screening to pinpoint possible difficulties with detoxification. Work with a health-care professional to identify supplements that can remediate glitches called single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs . 
  • Run antibody titers Find out which diseases you are already immune to by running blood titers.  Make sure that you are not a hepatitis carrier.  Put that in writing to prevent your baby from getting the Hep B shot at birth.
  • Remove any mercury-containing amalgams – Even one or two “silver” fillings off-gas into the mouth with brushing, chewing and drinking hot liquids. Mother’s mercury load crosses the placenta, landing in the liver and kidneys of the fetus. Infants’ levels correlate with the number of amalgams in the mother. Later, mercury shows up in the breast milk, which may provide better absorption of mercury in the nursing infant.  Be certain to have amalgams removed safely by a biological dentist.
  • Detoxify the bodyMothers dump a good part of their body burden into their unborn babies. Consider a homeopathic detox program that clears out chemicals, metals, parasites, bacteria, viruses and radiation. The lower your toxic load, the lower the baby’s.
  • Check for retained reflexesThe Spinal Galant and Asymmetric Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR) assist the baby in maneuvering through the birth canal.  Mothers who retain either of both of these reflexes may have difficulty giving birth naturally. The baby may not “drop,” be breech, or require a Cesarean section. Simple reflex integration activities for a month prior to birth can help the birth be smoother.

While Pregnant increase input in several areas:

  • FoodThe old saying that goes, “Eating for two,” is correct.  Make nutrient rich, not high caloric choices. Say “yes” to 75-100 grams of protein, organic fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, asparagus, spinach, nuts and free-range, antibiotic-free animals. Say “no” to sugar and its substitutes, wheat, dairy and hydrogenated fats.  Say “once-in-a-while” to small, cold water fish and soy products.  Take the time to sit down and eat slowly, chewing well.
  • Supplements While the right, good quality foods can provide much needed nutrition, eating adequate amounts of some nutrients is simply impossible. Contraceptives and other medications can deplete minerals. Calcium, mercury-free fish oils, iron, folate and B vitamins are essential for growing babies.  Work with a health care professional to determine the right amount for you.
  • Drinks At least eight cups of good quality water. No alcohol, sodas (especially diet), caffeinated tea or coffee.
  • Relaxation & SleepLearn meditation. Take a yoga class for expectant mothers. Practice daily, breathing deeply. Oxygenation of cells enhances their function. Releasing stress allows the body to put its energy into growing a healthy baby. Turn in before 10:00 pm and sleep at least nine hours.
  • ExerciseStretch to increase flexibility. Walk or attend a class two or three times a week.

How many sonograms do you need? It is really exciting to see a baby in utero, know whether it is a boy or girl, and then call it by name. But, no one knows the long-term effect of sonograms on the unborn baby. A sonogram is sound…sound as loud as a plane’s engines revving up in a baby’s ears. One study showed, the more sonograms, the more likely the baby is to have ear infections.  Another showed that babies later diagnosed with autism had endured three or more sonograms.  Consider limiting them unless medically necessary, and not do them just out of curiosity.

TAKE HOME POINTS

Know the risk factors for autism.  Limit exposures to toxins, while maximizing nutrition and health during preconception and pregnancy. Understand how your lifestyle choices support a baby’s health!  Every child deserves to be healthy, have the opportunities to develop language, have friends and learn! Autism is preventable! Let’s start now!  

Advertisements

Wonder

October 9, 2012

“I know I’m not an ordinary ten-year-old kid….I know ordinary kids don’t make other ordinary kids run away screaming in playgrounds.  I know ordinary kids don’t get stared at wherever they go… It’s like people you see sometimes, and you can’t imagine what it would be like to be that person, whether it’s somebody in a wheelchair or somebody who can’t talk.  Only, I know that I’m that person to other people… To me, though, I’m just me.  An ordinary kid.”

These are the thoughts of August (Auggie, to friends and family) Pullman, a fictitious boy who has endured 27 surgeries to correct extreme congenital facial anomalies of unknown origin.  Wonder is the remarkable first novel by R. J. Palacio that takes us with him to a private middle school, Beecher Prep, where he enters fifth grade after home-schooling for his elementary years.

The school is named for Henry Ward Beecher, a nineteenth century abolitionist defender of human rights. (How appropriate!) Beecher wrote that “greatness lies not in being strong, but in the right using of strength.”  “He is the greatest, whose strength carries up the most hearts by the attraction of his own.”

After Auggie’s parents make the difficult decision to send him off to Beecher Prep “like a lamb to the slaughter,” we learn about his heart and strengths through other, including his parents, sister, Olivia (Via, to friends and family), his principal, Mr. Tushman (yes, a little contrived), teachers and classmates.  Is it painful? Maudlin? A little. And, it is heartening and inspiring.

I have met thousands of families with kids like Auggie.  To them, their child with autism, cerebral palsy, or Down syndrome, is anything but ordinary.  Like Auggie’s parents, they see each and every child as a “wonder.”

This is beautiful story with many “talking points.”  It is book for all ages: one to be read to older elementary school kids, by middle and high school students, and by adults interested in human nature.  I recommend it strongly.

Radio Interviews – Listen in!

July 31, 2008

I have just completed three radio interviews about my new book EnVISIONing a Bright Future. What fun it is being on the “other side” of the table after a year as interviewer on Autism One Radio.  It’s amazing how much you can fit into a half hour with a good show host.  I was fortunate to be interviewed by the BEST!

First was on May 28th, with DC area nutritionist, Dana Laake, a long time DDR supporter and friend.  Dana’s show, “Essentials of Healthy Living™” is broadcast live Wednesday nights 5-6 pm on 1260 AM in the Washington, DC area.  If you are not in range, you can listen online at www.progressivetalk1260.com . This show is sponsored by The Village Green Apothecary in Bethesda, MD, another long time friend of DDR. Look in your new 2008 DDR Directory, which you should receive next week, for a discount coupon for nutritional supplements from the Village Green.  They also have copies of my book for sale. To listen to my interview, click on http://ehlradio.com/ArchivedShows/Index.htm

On July 9th, I was jointly interviewed by Chiropractor Larry Bronstein and Special Educator, Deborah Alecson, of CHILD Treatment and Consulting Services, on WBCR, 97.7 FM in Great Barrington, MA for their program, “Food For Thought: Children, Nutrition and Learning.”  We had a lively hour-long discussion of the various treatment options described in my book.  Since the station does not archive shows, I have the program on a CD.  As soon as I figure out how to upload it, I will put the link here.

For the above two interviews I simply dialed a phone number, and was magically broadcast live on the airways.  For my third interview, on July 23rd, I drove to Pittsburgh’s South Side to the studios of the Radio Information Service, a radio reading service for people with visual and physical disabilities.  There I was greeted warmly by Marilyn Egan, the host of ‘Towntalk,” who fitted me with a microphone and showed me how to use the “cough box,” should I feel the urge.

I had met one of the show’s co-producers, Joyce Driben, at a Disabilities Awareness Fair at PNC Park one beautiful evening in June, when the Pittsburgh Pirates honored individuals with all types of disabilities. Sight-impaired, Joyce had used a special machine to write down my phone number in Braille, and had her co-producer Jeanne Kaufman call me to set the date for my interview.  Radio Information Service (RIS) has been reading all types of print materials from newspapers to magazines, advertisements, books, death notices, and even TV listings to people with eyesight loss due to many causes for over 30 years. Qualified listeners can tune in for a small fee.  To listen to Joyce’s targeted interview of me, go to www.readingservice.org Click on “Listeners” and log in with the User Name: volunteer, and the Password: guest05.  Then click on Towntalk to hear the archived show.

I thank all those who have made these interviews possible and would be happy to do any others.  Please let me know if you have access to other opportunities.