Archive for the ‘Sleep Disorder’ Category

Stress

February 17, 2013

Stress from Google

Everyone is stressed! The fewer the stressors, the more opportunities for learning and development for children of all ages. Our goal is to identify and eliminate as many stressors as possible.

Environmental – Our homes and schools are full of stressors.
o Toxic Chemicals – Lead, mercury, antimony, aluminum, and other “heavy metals” reduce immunity, and interfere with the body’s ability to perform its many functions. Lead is “old news” and we know that any amount is unsafe for cognitive development. Every child should have lead levels tested.
Mercury, antimony, and aluminum are the “new” toxins that are also showing up in the bodies and brains of children with all types of delays. Their sources are power plants, ground water, petroleum plants, dental amalgams from the mother, vaccines, flame retardants, cookware, and other unlikely places. Read more about these metals here  and here.
Green your building with non-toxic materials for flooring, paint, cleaning supplies, building products, art and office supplies.
Chemicals from disinfectants, cleaners, building materials and other supplies “off gas” and when a person breathes them, they are toxic to the body. They are especially harmful to people with compromised immune systems, and those who have asthma.
The standard benchmark for design, construction, and operation of high-performance green buildings is LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). Find a green building in your city, learn who greened it and consult with them.  Here is a handbook on how to green an existing building.
o Air Pollution – Open the windows when possible. When too hot, make sure air conditioning equipment is clean and not moldy. Use HEPA (an acronym for “high efficiency particulate air”) indoor air filters throughout building. HEPA filters can trap a large amount of very small particles that vacuum cleaners recirculate back into the air.
o Fluorescent lighting – Replace with bulbs that do not make noise or flicker. Use bulbs that offer the right color of lighting. Read this article on lighting.
o Noise – Play soft, gentle music, such as Mozart, which is the same rate as the human heart beat. Read more information  on “The Mozart Effect.”
Biological – Our bodies are toxic waste dumps too. Reduce our exposures.
o Water – Good hydration is essential for learning. Ensuring that our drinking water is pure is one of the most important steps we can take for children with developmental delays. Water should be available and offered frequently. Use water filters throughout the building.
o Diet and Nutrition – What kids are eating can be the determining factor between health and sickness. This is especially true for children with developmental delays. Sugar is one of the most damaging of all products ingested. Read more about it here.
Encourage families to cook and not eat “fast food.” Help them understand the importance of a varied diet of natural foods, such as fruits, vegetables, good quality protein and good fats.
Research is showing that eliminating some foods from kids’ diets helps their development and learning tremendously. Many foods are shown to cause ear infections. Two types of foods that are particularly problematic for kids with delays are those containing gluten, the protein from wheat, and casein, the protein from dairy products. Read about gluten and dairy in many websites containing “gfcf.”
Children with Down syndrome have especially high nutritional needs. A company that specializes in the care and feeding of those with this genetic syndrome is Nutri-Chem, in Ottawa, Canada. The founder, Kent MacLeod, a pharmacist has written a book on the importance of diet and nutritional supplementation: Down Syndrome and Vitamin Therapy.
o Allergies – Many kids with developmental issues have allergies, not only to airborne particles, insects, and other environmental pests, but also to foods. Some allergies are life-threatening and immediate, such as shellfish and peanuts. Others are troublesome, causing fatigue, rashes, respiratory and digestive problems, and are delayed, taking hours or even days to show up. Read about the different kinds of allergic reactions here.

Physical – The physical body needs a good sensory diet and sleep to reduce stress.
o Movement – Use every opportunity to move to learn. Little children’s bodies learn by moving and using their senses of touch and having their muscles and joints take in sensations. Two good books about the importance of movement in learning are, Smart Moves: Why Learning is not all in Your Head, by Carla Hannaford, and Physical Activities for Improving Learning and Behavior by Cheatum. Obtain the workbook “Begin Where They Are,” with therapy activities, from http://oepf.org/product/begin-where-they-are-0.
o Reflexes – Over 100 different reflexes are programmed into the body to get the body moving appropriately. If demands on the body are premature, before the reflexes are fully integrated, then delayed development can be the result. Learn about reflexes through an intensive training session. Learn more about reflexes at http://masgutovamethod.com
o Vision – While some children have eyesight problems that can be corrected by glasses, others have vision issues, such as the two eyes not working together, in conditions called exotropia, esotropia and strabismus. Motor activities that are the foundation for vision development and the body must be strong to support binocular vision. The relationship between vision and learning can also be a training session for those at the center. To learn more about vision, read this.
A book explaining the role of vision in learning is How to Develop Your Child’s Intelligence by Getman.
o Hearing – Listening is to hearing as vision is to eyesight. Although a child can hear, his brain may not process what it hears. Several “listening programs” are available to help children give meaning to what they hear. Look here for understanding of this area.
o Sleep – Everyone needs uninterrupted sound sleep for their bodies to heal and repair. Pre-school aged children require 11-12 hours of sleep per night. Young children with disabilities might need more if they are contending with health issues. Help parents and teachers understand their kids’ need for rest periods. Read this.
Educational – Schools are often unknowingly a source of stress too.
o Inappropriate curriculum – All children learn in a predictable developmental sequence, just as they learn to walk before they run. We discourage teaching rote concepts such as the alphabet, counting and naming to young children. These skills will emerge when a child is developmentally ready. Here is an article on this subject.

o Non-ergonomic furniture – Sitting in small chairs when the trunk and head are not stable only results in compensatory techniques like tilting the head and rotating the hips. Replace hard, wooden chairs with soft gym mats, beanbags, cushions and pillows to help children develop core strength.

Emotional – Families have so many situations that add stress.
o Unreasonable expectations – This stressor is tied to the one above related to an inappropriate curriculum. Children want to please adults, and when they cannot comply with expectations, they become discouraged. Make sure that requirements are consistent with a child’s developmental age.
o Worries and fears – Some kids like being around many people; others find crowds difficult. It appeared that many of the children we saw were somewhat fearful of having so many adults watching and prodding them. Observations should be limited to one or two adults at a time until a child is comfortable emotionally.
o Family Issues – Today’s families, especially those with multiple children with disabilities, are under a great deal of stress. They need support systems to help them cope. Offer parent and sibling support groups where adults and children can share their experiences and learn from each other.

Behavioral – Treating symptoms is never the right answer.
o Medications – Pharmaceutical and over-the-counter drugs all have side effects which can cause behavioral symptoms as benign as restlessness and irritability, and as serious as rashes, seizures and fevers. They can also interfere with sensory processing, such as cause double vision and tactile defensiveness. Instead of treating symptoms, look for natural alternatives to prescription drugs, and search for underlying causes of illness, such as food allergies and toxicity,.
o Screen Time – While young children are attracted to the bright colors, sounds and movement of objects on computers, iPads, and iPhones, these two-dimensional objects are not good for development. To learn, children need to touch and see objects in three dimensions, not on flat screens. Please consider replacing electronic toys with playthings made out of natural materials. For non-verbal children, speaking with real people is superior to speaking to a machine. Psychologist Jane Healy is the expert on brain development and screen time. Please refer to her books, Failure to Connect: How Computers Affect Our Children’s Minds — and What We Can Do About It, and Your Child’s Growing Mind: Brain Development and Learning From Birth to Adolescence.

Summary
Even with loving, supportive parents and teachers, the our lifestyle and environment add stress to the lives of our children with developmental delays. Start with the physical environment, and reduce exposures to noise, light, toxins and sensory overload. Every time you replace a product, purchase one of higher quality with fewer toxins. Gradually, stressors will reduce, and the home and school will be more conducive places for learning and growing.

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Biological Medicine: The Latest from Dietrich Klinghardt

March 6, 2012

I just spent three days in New York glued to every word from my favorite genius, Dietrich Klinghardt, MD, PhD .  My head is spinning!  I want to shout his knowledge from the top of every mountain and have it echo across the world.  Instead, I will have to depend upon the magic of the Internet and cyberspace to get the word out.  Here are some of the highlights bursting from my brain in no particular order.

  • Electro-smog – My daughter says I am obsessed with the dangers of electro-magnetic fields, and maybe I am.  Listening to Dietrich and Magda Havas, PhD, a Canadian expert on the subject, is chilling.  The biological effects of electromagnetic pollution are only beginning to be understood.  With exposures escalating at exponential rates, electro-smog is being associated with an increasing number of diseases and conditions. 

Electro-smog refers to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and radio frequency radiation (RFR) generated by our use of electricity and wireless devices.  It includes High frequency radiation from microwaves, cellular phones and wireless, Intermediate frequencies from “dirty electricity” emanating from transformers, fluorescent lighting, computers and plasma televisions and Low frequency fields from computers, copiers, clock radios and electric heaters. 

Here’s a couple of gems that I gleaned:  1. The keyboards of laptop computers send dangerous radiation into your hands!  Solution: Attach an external keyboard.  2.  Exercising on a treadmill raises blood sugar markedly because of the EMFs!  Solution:  Exercise out-of-doors.  3. Compact fluorescent light bulbs give off high levels of EMFs!  Solution:  Stock up on incandescent bulbs or change to LEDs. 4. Teachers in “hot rooms” in schools (computer labs especially) took far more “sick” days than other teachers!  Solution:  Get out of computer labs!

General solution:  Buy a Gauss meter and take measurements of EMFs at home and school.  Purchase filters for electrical outlets that block dirty electricity.  Remove all computers, plasma TVs and wireless phones from the bedroom.  For more information on this important subject, go to www.lessemf.com and www.stetzerelectric.com

  • PANS is the new name for PANDAS – What used to be known as PANDAs for Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder associated with Strep has been shortened to PANS for Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome because bugs in addition to strep are causing the same obsessive-compulsive symptoms.  See Scientific American February 2, 2012.  Lyme and Mycoplasma bacteria, Epstein Barr Virus, and bartonella (the bug that causes “cat scratch” disease) are just a few that have been added to the list of infectious triggers.
  • Tonsils: “the Achilles heel of the human condition” – The big news is what Klinghardt brings to the PANS discussion.  He believes that these bugs live in the infected tonsils of their human hosts, and he has designed a very complex treatment including injecting them, with procaine and ozone, gargling with a fermented product rich in biofilm-dissolving enzymes, and, as a last resort removing them with cryotherapy (burning them off) so they will regenerate.  Read about this procedure in an article from the DDR newsletter.
  • Cats do not belong in the home – I am a cat lover.  My 18-year-old Tussy Pat decided not relocate from Maryland to Pittsburgh two weeks before my move, and I have not replaced her.  After listening to the dangers of having a cat in the house from Dietrich, I’m actually happy I made that decision.  He believes that bartonella is one of many critters that prefer humans to their feline hosts.  The bugs jump and the whole family gets sick.  Solution:  Not cats on the bed or sofa.  They belong outside where they can catch mice, their reason for existence!   Is your cat making YOU sick?  Read this new article in the Atlantic.
  • Doctor your water – We’ve all heard that we are supposed to drive eight glasses of water a day.  Any water?  Absolutely not, according to Klinghardt!  Tap water needs to be treated by reverse osmosis to remove fluoride.  Also add electrolytes and minerals.  Good hydration is an essential foundation for the kidneys BEFORE starting any detoxification program. Klinghardt also believes that dehydration can lead to mitochondrial disorders by slowing down the speed of electrical impluses.
  • Sleep safely – Along with good hydration, a safe sleeping environment are the two most important factors for health.  In addition to removing all EMFs from the bedroom (see above), he puts suggests a sleep “cocktail” made up of tryptophan, 5HTP and lithium oratate for all his patients.  For those with severe insomnia he also recommends the use of a cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) machine for 20 minutes between dinner and bedtime.  Stimulation is applied through electrodes placed on the ears.  The efficacy and safety of CES therapy is supported by many studies in the US and in the former Soviet Union where it was developed in the 1950’s. A doctor’s prescription for its use for sleep disorders is required.
  • Parasite testing – As I discovered personally, stool testing for parasites is notoriously unreliable.  Klinghardt helped me understand why.  The live bugs rarely come out, and if they do, they secrete a film that within 15 minutes makes them invisible!  Only “fresh” poop can show parasites, so either buy a high-powered microscope or go to a lab that is prepared to whisk the stool sample away immediately and test it.  Forget those which require freezing and mailing.
  • New Homeopathics – Dietrich has formulated some new remedies that are prepared in a special energetic matrix of sacred water, natural amino acids, minerals and vitamins.  The frequencies of the peptides and remedies are imprinted energetically, using a newly developed laser/electromagnetic technology from Europe.  These homepathics are far less expensive than other treatments for resolving autoimmunity issues, treating co-infections of Lyme, and assisting with the transport and elimination of heavy metals.  Order from www.BioPure.eu
  • Activated Charcoal depletes Vitamin C – This oft-used “harmless” product should be replaced by MicroSilica, which not only absorbs excess water in uncontrollable diarrhea, but also activates detoxification enzymes.

These are only a few of the many pearls I gleaned from my three days in New York.  If you are interested in more, I strongly recommend purchasing the proceedings, which will be available in April from the Klinghardt Academy, www.klinghardtacademy.com.  Better yet, go to one of Dietrich’s  upcoming trainings and experience his magic yourself.

What Does "Keeping Kids Healthy" REALLY mean?

November 4, 2009

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The TV bombards us with ads promising that vaccines and pharmaceutical products will “keep you and your family” healthy during the flu season.  Are there alternatives?

I just gave a talk at a local school on “staying healthy.”  Parents came armed with notepads, ready to hear my favorite natural solutions to sniffles and coughs. They went home with those.  However, I started with a question:  Does “healthy” necessarily mean, “not sick?”

Philip Incao, MD, a physician in Colorado, describes health as “a beautiful sunny day with a brilliant blue sky and no clouds in sight.  At any time, if our Spirit is strong, then, like the sun we can dissolve the clouds that come our way. Sometimes too many clouds form at the same time, or a cloud becomes too large and obscures the sun’s light. If we don’t pay attention to these messages, the clouds can grow and merge into a huge thunderstorm. After the rain, the sky becomes clear again.”

I really love this description.  I can visualize my spirit making those clouds go away. I am also well aware of times when I have not paid attention to the messages and I have endured some thunderstorms!

Here are some of the points from my talk. 

Main ingredients for a strong immune system:

  • Nutritious, unprocessed, organic food in season,
  • Clean, filtered air and water
  • Daily and ample sleep/ exercise/ sun / nature

Impediments to staying healthy:

  • Toxins from foods, environment
  • Lifestyle stressors in job, family, friends
  • Issues of inconvenience and changing long standing habits

Here is a list of specific foods and supplements that boost the immune system. Thank you to Lisa Rudley for helping to compile it.

Foods  “Warming” foods. Less raw; more well-cooked for winter.  Soups and stews. Seasonal fruits – apples, pears, persimmons, vegetables – root veggies- onions, turnips, squash, parsnips, beets, radishes, greens, kale, collards, cilantro, parsley. Limit sugar!  Read Animal Vegetable Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver.   

Supplements

Vitamin A – Important for vision and mucous membrane integrity.   RDA 1,000-2,000 IU for children,

Vitamin C – 2-4 grams per day or to “bowel tolerance.”  

Vitamin D3 – Adults need 5,000 IU when midday sun exposure is not possible. Infants need 1,000 IU, and older children need 2,000 IU. – Need good oils for absorption.

Vitamin E –  Anti-inflammatory effects and increases resistance to infection. Use only natural vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol), not the synthetic form (dl-alpha-tocopherol). A mixed tocopherol form of vitamin E is best because children need the gamma as well as the alpha forms. 100 mg for children under two and 200 mg for children aged 2-12.

Omega-3 fatty acids – As fresh, wild, cold-water small fish or their oils in capsules or liquid form.   Salmon, cod, mackerel, sardines. Flax & Hemp seeds for vegans.

Zinc – 25 mg zinc per day, but if you continue zinc for an extended period of time also take copper to prevent a deficiency (10:1 ratio of copper to zinc).

Colostrum – Immunoglobulin IgA coats the intestinal lining preventing attack by pathogens. Lactoferrin locks onto iron releasing it to red blood cells and depriving bacteria of the iron they need for reproduction. Lysozyme destroys microorganisms on contact. Cytokines boost T-cell activity and stimulate production of a baby’s own protective immunoglobulins. Polysaccharides bind to bacteria and block their attachment to mucus membranes. Take two capsules twice a day through the winter months.

Mushrooms: Activate white blood cells and stimulate antibodies. Reishi (ganoderma), maitake (grifola), shiitake (lentinus), polyporus, and tremella.  Use dried or in tablet, powder, or liquid extract form.

Homeopathics:

Influenzinum – One dose each week for 4 weeks (9C, 12C, or 30C) if you are exposed to the flu.   

Osccillococcinum – 3 X a day for 2-3 days

In today’s fast-paced world we “need” our kids to be “not sick.”  If they have to miss school, one of us has to miss work, or grandma, a friend, or other relative has to fill in.  It’s inconvenient, and in using a pathology model, means that something has gone amiss. 

If we trust our bodies, though, “sick” actually means our immune system is working well.  By coughing we bring up mucous; fevers help clear out toxins; rashes mean detoxification. In fact, in the “olden days” getting sick was a bi-annual house-cleaning ritual! 

Dr. Alan Scherr of the Northport Wellness Center on Long Island suggests that we give kids “well days” instead of “sick days!”  I like the idea of putting health into the positive.  Staying home is respectful of your body’s working to stay well. 

Nature is the greatest healer. Take a walk through the leaves. Hike, sit under a tree by a stream. One of the greatest gifts we can give ourselves and our children is to “SLOW DOWN,” says Susan Johnson, MD, a California pediatrician. Remember, doing “nothing” is often the best!